Report says youth unemployment chronic, concentrated and deeply rooted

Toni Ross works at Food and Paper Supply Co. on Jan. 27, 2017, in Chicago's Grand Crossing neighborhood. Ross has worked at the food service distributor for 27 years; she was hired through a youth program and is now store manager. The business' co-owner is slated to speak at a forum on youth unemployment Jan. 30, 2017. (Phil Velasquez / Chicago Tribune)

Toni Ross works at Food and Paper Supply Co. on Jan. 27, 2017, in Chicago’s Grand Crossing neighborhood. Ross has worked at the food service distributor for 27 years; she was hired through a youth program and is now store manager. The business’ co-owner is slated to speak at a forum on youth unemployment Jan. 30, 2017. (Phil Velasquez / Chicago Tribune)

An article from the Chicago Tribune highlights a new report from Great Cities Institute and commissioned by Alternative Schools Network for a January 30, 2017 hearing on youth joblessness at the Chicago Urban League. The report finds that youth unemployment is chronic, concentrated and deeply rooted.

Chicago is making scant progress in its ongoing battle against rampant youth joblessness, new statistics show, though there is a modicum of good news.

The share of 20- to 24-year-old black men who were neither working nor in school declined modestly between 2014 and 2015, from a dismal 47 percent to a still-dismal 43 percent, according to a report set to be presented Monday at the Chicago Urban League’s annual forum on the youth unemployment crisis.

Full Story from the Chicago Tribune »

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